English

English

Our Vision:
It is our aim to motivate, enthuse and inspire our students at all key stages. We believe that it is our responsibility to enable all learners, regardless of their context or circumstance, to achieve their potential and make at least good progress throughout each key stage. Through our delivery of the English curriculum we aim to foster a genuine enjoyment of both Literature and English Language. It is our ultimate aim that all students leaving Temple Moor are confident communicators and independent learners who possess lifelong literacy skills.

Our Staff:
Assistant Principal for English: Jane Dixon
Subject Leader: Vicki Byrne & Helen Hebden
Programme Leaders: Kelli Armour, Michael Storey & Lisa Robinson

Teachers of English
Rebecca Maidens, Sara Linsdell, Sharine Gibson, Roseleen McGowan, Rebecca French, Daniel Rushton & Ian Smith

Why Study English and what skills will I develop?
English is a core subject in the National Curriculum and at year 11, our students study two courses: GCSE English and the iGCSE in English Literature. Our year 10 students will study the new AQA GCSE in both English Language and English Literature.

English enables you to understand and enjoy a wide variety of reading materials as well as develop good communication skills. We also feel that the study of literature can help students develop empathy for different kinds of people from different backgrounds and enable young people to have a better understanding of the world in which they live in the 21st century. An understanding of the media and the development of skills such as inference and deduction and being able to identify bias is also increasingly important in the modern world in which our students are part.

Developed levels of literacy are valuable in all areas of life and most employers will expect a GCSE in English as a matter of course. The study of English Language and English Literature can lead to a multitude of career paths including the following: journalism, advertising, marketing, public relations, broadcasting and teaching.

Through the study of English, students will become a skilled writer and be able to understand and be critical of a wider choice of reading materials. Students will understand writing from different viewpoints and perspectives and be able to identify the purpose behind writing and the methods utilised for the writer to achieve their purpose. Students will develop a love of literature and language and be able to recognise the power of language in a world driven by communication and the media. Students will also become more confident in their speaking and listening abilities and will be able to speak confidently in a variety of contexts on a variety of topics.

Our Students:
At Temple Moor we teach students across Key Stage 3, Key Stage 4 and Key Stage 5.  In Year 7 and Year 8, students are set according to teacher assessment of their ability. Students are also placed in sets in Key Stage 4, according to their ability. We teach a wide range of abilities throughout the school, ranging from gifted and talented students to those who join us with very basic literacy skills.

Key Stage 3:
In Year 7 students’ learning is predominantly skills based and includes reading, writing and speaking and listening.  Students will study drama including Shakespeare, poetry, creative writing and the novel within their first year at Temple Moor.  They cover a range of writing skills, using a study of gothic horror as a stimulus for creative and descriptive writing as well as looking at a variety of writing taken from a range of non-fiction sources, enabling them to develop their ability to write from different viewpoints and perspectives, using a variety of methods to achieve their aims. Through these schemes, pupils are given the opportunity to write in variety of styles, developing their literacy skills whilst being creative and imaginative.

Students will read a variety of texts from Shakespeare’s ‘The Tempest’ to the war poetry of Wilfred Owen to ‘War Horse’ by Michael Morpurgo and will build reading skills starting from comprehension and moving through inference and deduction and the identification and analysis of methods and techniques such as the author’s use of language, form and structure. In addition to this, students enjoy a ‘class reader’ at the start of every lesson, using texts from ‘The Twits’ to ‘Holes’ to foster an enjoyment of reading and to improve literacy. Every year 7 lesson also has a literacy starter, focused on spelling, grammar or punctuation.

To further support the pupils’ progress in reading, Year 7 classes have a fortnightly session based around ‘guided reading’. During this lesson, the children work in groups on various activities, while the teacher works with groups on a rota basis, assessing students’ reading ability and working with small groups on improving their reading. This is an opportunity for the teacher to give individual help and to assess each child’s progress and needs in reading. There is also a fortnightly lesson in the library, using accelerated reader, where students read and are assessed on their reading using the accelerated reader system. Again, this gives the teacher time to focus on honing this important skill.

Some students, who are identified at the end of KS2, follow a slightly different curriculum intended to improve their literacy skills. These students also have some lessons that follow the traditional English year 7 syllabus.

The Year 8 syllabus continues to build on the skills learned in Year 7. The programme of study in both years is designed to prepare the students fully for the new 2015 AQA GCSE language and literature courses they will undertake in Key Stage 4. In Year 8, all students continue to take part in accelerated reading, designed to improve their reading ability through the students’ reading texts, which are specifically designed for their reading age. Students continue with guided reading once a fortnight and also enjoy class readers such as ‘Ruby in the Smoke’ and ‘The Boy in the Dress’. Year 8 lessons also employ a literacy starter as in year 7.  Students will read a variety of texts from Shakespeare’s ‘Othello to the poetry of John Agard to ‘Animal Farm by George Orwell and will continue to build reading skills such as comprehension, inference and deduction and the identification and analysis of methods and techniques such as the author’s use of language, form and structure.

Students again cover a range of writing skills, using a study of short stories as a stimulus for creative and descriptive writing as well as again looking at a variety of writing taken from a range of non-fiction sources, enabling them to develop their ability to write from different viewpoints and perspectives, using a variety of methods to achieve their aims. Through these schemes, pupils are again given the opportunity to write in variety of styles, developing their literacy skills whilst being creative and imaginative.

Key Stage 4:
Key Stage 4 courses at Temple Moor begin in Year 9, where students will begin to practise skills needed for a GCSE in English. In Year 9 students’ learning is still predominantly skills based and includes reading, writing and speaking and listening but there is now more emphasis on preparation for the exams in year 11 with assessments mirroring more closely the assessment styles of the GCSE.  Students will study Shakespeare, poetry, creative writing and the novel within this year at Temple Moor.  They cover a range of writing skills, using a study of extracts from short stories as a stimulus for creative and descriptive writing as well as looking at a variety of writing taken from a range of non-fiction sources, enabling them to develop their ability to write from different viewpoints and perspectives, using a variety of methods to achieve their aims. Through these schemes, pupils are not only given the opportunity to write in variety of styles and to develop their literacy skills whilst being creative and imaginative, but they are also being prepared for the styles of questions they will face at GCSE.

Students will read a variety of texts from Shakespeare’s ‘Much Ado About Nothing to a range of modern poetry from poets such as Simon Armitage to Robert Louis Stephenson’s ‘Jekyll and Hyde’ and will build reading skills starting from comprehension and moving through inference and deduction and the identification and analysis of methods and techniques such as the author’s use of language, form and structure. Student’s skills, knowledge and understanding will be tested in assessments designed to mirror those from the new 2015 AQA GCSE language and literature specifications.

Students in year ten continue to learn the skills needed for the new AQA language specification, sat at the end of year eleven. Students study a variety of texts such as ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ to learn how a writer may use language and structure for effect, and to learn how to evaluate the writer’s methods. Students are given a variety of stimuli to prompt creative writing, building on what they have learned about the creative choices made by the writer in their ‘Exploration of Creative Reading’ module. Students are taught a range of methods and techniques to enhance their writing as part of this module. Students will also look at a variety of writing taken from newspapers, magazines, blogs and websites where a writer has written from a particular viewpoint or perspective. This will enable students to engage with topics that are relevant to their lives today as well as teaching them the skills and methods a writer will employ when writing from a particular perspective with an aim in mind. Students will also learn about spoken language and the skills needed to speak, listen and communicate in a variety of contexts in a separate unit of work. Lastly, students will also study a range of poetry in preparation for their English Literature exam at the end of year eleven. In this module, students will be taught how to analyse a poem, focusing on the writer’s use of methods and techniques such as their use of structure, form and language. Students will study a diverse range of poetry, including the likes of Carol Ann Duffy. The students are examined on every module of the course, using exam style questions at the end of each unit of work, which usually take place over one half term. By the end of year ten, the students should have studied all of the modules examined in the English language exam at the end of year eleven. Year eleven will then be spent focusing on the GCSE in English literature and revising the skills needed for the English language paper.

Students in this year’s year 11 will still be following the old AQA English language specification (now in its final year) a course examined through both controlled assessment and external examination. All students will study English Language and English Literature, receiving two distinct qualifications. All students in year eleven will study the traditional English GCSE in language. All students will study the iGCSE qualification in English Literature. In year eleven, all students will study two literature texts in order to write a comparison for their English literature coursework. The two texts are chosen from a variety including Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Dickens’ ‘A Christmas Carol’ or Robert Browning’s dramatic monologues. Students will also study a text examined in the English literature exam, ranging from Shakespeare’s ‘Romeo and Juliet’ to ‘Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time’ by Haddon. Students will be taught to analyse and appreciate the writer’s use of language, structure and form for effect. Students will continue to study a variety of poetry to prepare them for their unseen poetry questions on the literature paper, again looking at the methods used by the writers and developing the skills of language and structural analysis as well as inference and deduction. Students will continue to develop reading and writing skills through the study of a variety of non-fiction texts, practicing the skills of writing to describe, explain, argue, persuade and inform.

Media Studies:

Students that study Media follow the BTEC Firsts in Creative Digital Media Production, which is designed to be the first step in developing the technical and communication skills needed for the progression onto advanced level courses or employment in the media industries.  The course enables students to develop essential skills desirable in the workplace, colleges and higher education institutions including: self-management, team working, business awareness and customer awareness, problem solving, communication, basic literacy and numeracy, a positive attitude to work, and the use of IT.  Independence is also a key skill developed as students will be required to choose their own methods of presenting their work: electronic and verbal presentations; film, blogs and written proposals for example.  Students will be introduced to digital media products and the process involved in creating them; they will learn how audiences use and interact with creative digital media products and will research, plan and create new creative digital media products including television advertisements and magazines.

Through the length of study, students will complete a number of units which are combined in order for them to complete the course and be awarded with the certificate.  For Unit 1, the students will be prepared in advance to complete an external examination on digital media sectors and their audiences.  Unit 2 is a core unit and focuses on the planning and pitching of a digital media product.  Unit 3: Digital Moving Image Production is studied in connection with Unit 2 and gives students an insight into the technical elements of creating moving image media as well as the opportunity to film and edit an advertisement for a teenage awareness campaign.  Finally, Unit 5 Digital Publishing Production, is designed to enable students to understand the history behind publishing print media and the changes to this due to advancements in technology and the advent of e-media.  Students are then once again given the opportunity to create their own products – a print or e-media magazine.

Key Stage 5/Sixth Form:
The English faculty have a long history of success at Key Stage 5 within English Language, English Literature and Media.  We teach students with a wide range of ability across these subject areas, delivering both A Level and BTEC qualifications, and aim to enable all students to achieve their potential, with the vast majority going on to further education after leaving us.

English Literature:

Students that study English Literature follow the new AQA B specification in lessons designed to cater for both students studying AS Level only and for those students going onto study A Level. Year 12 students will study tragedy through the texts, ‘Death of a Salesman’ by Arthur Miller and Shakespeare’s ‘King Lear’ being assessed in exam style questions designed to mirror the AS and A Level exam. Students will also study ‘The Great Gatsby’ by Fitzgerald and the poetry of Keats. Students will also begin preparation for their coursework module, looking at literary theory using a range of texts.

Year 13 students follow the last year of the AQA English Literature B specification, studying the gothic genre, suing the texts, ‘Macbeth’ by Shakespeare, ‘The Bloody Chamber’ by Angela Carter and ‘Wuthering Heights’ by Bronte. Students are assessed through exam style questions continually throughout the year as well as through mock exam. Students will also study literary theory, applying Marxism, feminism and a variety of interpretations to extracts from a range of texts in preparation for the study of texts chosen by themselves, which they will then compare in their coursework. Students will be taught how to sustain an argument as well as how to independently analyse a writer’s use of language, form and structure for effect, building on the skills they have learned over the course.

English Language:
Students that study English Language follow the new AQA B specification in lessons designed to cater for both students studying AS Level only and for those students going onto study A Level. Year 12 students will be introduced to the terminology applicable for close textual analysis and taught how meaning is created in a variety of texts. They will be taught methods of language analysis such as pragmatics, graphology, phonetics, phonology, register and discourse structure. Students will be taught how context is used to construct meaning and how to analyse texts with a specific focus on mode. Students will study textual variations and representations through a range of texts about various subjects from various writers and speakers for various audiences, purposes and genres.

When analysing texts, students will explore how language is used to construct meanings and representations and used to enact relationships between writers, speakers and audiences or between participants within a text. Students will also study language diversity and change. Students will be able to demonstrate expertise and creativity in the use of English to communicate in different ways, looking at texts using different sociolects (to include social and occupational groups, and gender), written, spoken and electronic texts about a range of subjects, for various audiences and purposes; items from collections of language data such as dictionaries and online resources; research findings, such as tables, graphs, statistics.

When analysing texts and data, students will explore how language varies because of personal and social contexts, why language varies, developing critical knowledge and understanding of different views and explanations of how identity is constructed, how language is used to enact relationships as well as attitudes to language diversity.

In year 13, students will study language development in relation to change and acquisition, exploring contemporary and historical change in language, as well as theories and concepts in relation to how children acquire both spoken and written language. Students will build on their understanding of terminology and key linguistic methods to analyse language in arrange of contexts. Students will complete a coursework element which requires students to carry out an independent language investigation within an area of their choice. Students will draw on their knowledge of social contexts as well as language development to choose a specific linguistic area within which students will source their own data before carrying out a full linguistic investigation.

Media Studies:

At Key Stage 5, students choosing to study Media Studies will follow the AS and A2 AQA Media Studies specification. Throughout the study of these qualifications, students will develop knowledge, critical understanding and skills across a range of media platforms. They will engage with media debates and issues, understand and utilise media theories and understand the significance of the context in which media texts are produced and consumed. The course is structured into four modules across the AS and A2 courses. As well as assessment by means of examinations at AS and A2 level, students will also have the opportunity to plan, create and evaluate media products for assessed coursework.

Year 7 Curriculum Map
Year 8 Curriculum Map
Year 9 Curriculum Map
Year 10 Curriculum Map
Year 11 Curriculum Map
Year 12 Lit Curriculum Map
Year 13 Lit Curriculum Map

 

MEDIA
Year 9 Curriculum Map BTEC Creative Digital Media
Year 10 Curriculum Map BTEC Creative Digital Media
Year 11 Curriculum Map BTEC Creative Digital Media
Year 12 Media Curriculum Map
Year 13 Media Curriculum Map